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Noodle Expert Member

January 23, 2020

One of the things that is set in many students minds when they first enter college is that they need to find a major that will earn them money in the end. Careers in music, theatre and com

One of the things that is set in many students minds when they first enter college is that they need to find a major that will earn them money in the end. Careers in music, theatre and communications are frowned upon because of the lack of the high salary jobs in those fields. I was lucky enough to have a family that supported me fully as I went into the career of journalism, but I have several friends who have questioned themselves and wondered whether or not they should be in the major they are in.

The thought of changing your major or going after a career that may not work in the long run can be scary, but what I believe is that you should be doing something that you’re passionate about. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, around 80 percent of students in the United States change their major at least once. What needs to be considered when changing your major is the timeliness and whether or not you can afford to possibly stay at the university for longer than the amount of time you had originally planned. While all of these things need to be taken into account, changing your major can actually be a good thing. You are probably shocked at hearing this, but the fact is, if you are thinking about switching from one career to another, then you’re learning more about yourself, and self realization is an important step in your life.

If you feel unhappy in the major you’re currently in, take a moment to step away from it all. Write down the things you enjoy and dislike. If you feel like the dislikes are outweighing the others, then it’s time to reevaluate yourself and find what you’re passionate about. You can do this by sitting in on a class in an area of study you’re interested in or ask professors and other students in the major what it’s like. Consider the timing and how many credits will be able to overlap and in the end, if all else fails, just go with your gut.

Ultimately, only you know what career is right for you, and while you can take as many aptitude tests and talk to as many counselors as you want, only you know what you will be happy doing. The phrase “choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life" may seem corny, but it’s true. Nobody wants to work in a place that they are unhappy, and while all careers have their downfalls, you shouldn’t be stuck in one because you’re afraid of disappointing people. So go out there and find your passion and don’t let the fear of failure stand in your way.